Charter Schools Education Industry For-Profit Pennsylvania

Charter Chain Won’t Answer Questions, Hires Lobbyists

Interesting essay samples and examples on: https://essays.io/dissertation-examples-samples/

In December, the York (Pennsylvania) Dispatch tried to meet with representatives from Charter Schools USA, the Florida for-profit chain that has been selected by the district’s receiver to take control of the city’s financially strapped public schools. The company canceled the meeting. The newspaper submitted 36 questions. The company did not respond to 12 of them.

“Those questions include the following: Will Charter Schools USA allow employees to unionize? How much does the average teacher make at a school operated by Charter Schools USA? What is CEO Jonathan Hage’s annual salary? How much profit does Charter Schools USA expect to make on the York City contract?

“The Dispatch recently reiterated those questions to the company.

“Due to the current status of contract negotiations, Charter Schools USA will not be visiting our market for one-on-one media interviews until more information is known regarding the future of a potential contract in York,” Kernan wrote in response. “Should the situation change indicating potential movement on the contract, Charter Schools USA will welcome face-to-face interviews regarding the students of the York City School District. Charter Schools USA continues to be focused on providing educational opportunities for students.”

Kernan said Charter Schools USA would also decline phone or email interview requests.”

Meanwhile CSUSA has hired a prominent lobbying firm to represent its interests in Harrisburg.

“Malady & Wooten lists a diversity of clients on its website — from major retailers like Walmart, Target and Rite Aid to smaller interests like the Pennsylvania Golf Course Owners Association and several schools for deaf and blind children.”

“Calls to Malady & Wooten were not returned.”

Two questions occur:

First, how can any corporation make a profit managing a district with a tax base too small to support its schools?

Second, doesn’t the state have a constitutional obligation to provide public education to all children? If the district can’t afford to maintain its schools, doesn’t the state have an obligation to subsidize its schools rather than giving them away to a company whose first responsibility is to make a profit?

Related posts

Sue Legg: Is the Florida Legislature Planning to Undermine Teachers’ Pensions?

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Alabama Welcomes For-Profit K12 Online School to Suck $$ Out of Its Underfunded Public Schools

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

BREAKING NEWS! Bombshell Report on Dark Money Behind School Privatization in Massachusetts

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

A Debate about Education Reform on NPR “To the Point” with Warren Olney

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

LINK Added! Philadelphia: Non-Diverse Charter School Appeals Against Conditions on Its Renewal, Wants to Maintain White Majority

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Please Read Andrea Gabor’s “After the Education Wars,” an Important Book That Points the Way to Genuine Reform

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

FairTest: Testing Resistance News

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Detroit Free Press Editorial: Say NO to DeVos

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Los Angeles: UTLA Calls on Board to Toss Out All Decisions Where Ref Rodriguez Cast Deciding Vote

V4tgDpeDBhQGUBa7

Leave a Comment